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LIVE GIG REVIEWS

Halestorm

Ryan Hamilton & The Harlequin Ghosts

HRH C.R.O.W.S

Glenn Hughes

MICHAEL MONROE BAND

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MICHAEL MONROE BAND

02 Academy

Glasgow

10th November 2018

Gig Review by

Graeme McAlister

Photo taken by Rockfiend at Hard Rock Hell

March 2017

Arriving in Glasgow straight off the back of an eight date headlining tour of Michael’s home country of Finland, the ‪Michael Monroe‬ Band owned the stage from the moment they set foot on it. Tonight, the band were providing support for the MC50 anniversary tour before it moved on to Manchester and London. And they squeezed every second out of their 12 song, sub-45 minute set …. and, yes, you did just read 12 songs in less than 45 minutes. No time wasted on unnecessary filler or long, drawn-out songs here when you have three and half minute slices of glam/punk perfection.

The well-constructed set provided a good mix of career-spanning material including ‪Hanoi Rocks‬, ‪Demolition 23‬, Michael’s first solo album and more recent output from The ‪Michael Monroe‬ Band’s three studio albums.

‘Ballad of the Lower East Side’ provided the perfect set opener as the sing-a-long vocals and guitar built up before the band literally kicked themselves into action with the ‪Michael Monroe‬ Band’s trademark glam/punk, and in-your-face, raucous sound with a level of intensity, raw energy and intention unseen in most bands. Without pausing for breath, the band launched into ‘Trick of the Wrist’, Hanoi favourite ‘Malibu Beach Nightmare’ and ‘Old King’s Road’. Followed in short order by ‘This Ain’t No Love Song’, ‘78’, a cover of ‪Alice Cooper‬’s ‘Long Way To Go’ and two songs off ‪Demolition 23‬ – ‘Nothin’s Alright’ and ‘Hammersmith Palais’.

The band’s trashy sound and attitude is loved by fans, but is far from sloppy. Those less familiar with the band may be surprised by the top-quality level of musicianship underpinning this. ‪Michael Monroe‬ remains a cool, compelling and charismatic frontman and is backed by seasoned professionals in the form of his long-time Hanoi Rocks bandmate Sami Yaffa on bass, ‪Steve Conte‬ (ex-‪New York Dolls‬) and Rich Jones (ex-Yo-Yos) on guitar, and drummer-to-many Karl Rosqvist. For much of the show, the band benefitted from a sixth, unofficial, member on stage, as a stage technician raced around behind their hyperactive singer, untangling his trailing and incredibly long microphone cable as he paced the stage, inter-played with other band members, repeatedly stood atop the crush barrier at the front of the stage and climbed the speaker stacks in truly athletic form. It is also a testament to the on-going quality of song writing that more recent songs such as ‘Ballad of the Lower East Side’ and ‘Old King’s Road’ held their own with Hanoi classics.

The highlight of the gig for me was undoubtedly hearing ‘Hammersmith Palais’ off of the ‪Demolition 23‬ album which Michael recorded in 1994 after ‪Hanoi Rocks‬ split up and before his solo career. Also featuring ‪Sami Yaffa‬ and ‪Nasty Suicide‬, this under-rated and often over-looked album had a punkier edge to it and no song better captures this than the defining ‘Hammersmith Palais’. The set then charged to a close with ‘Not Fakin’ It’, ‘Up Around the Bend’ and ‘Dead, Jail or Rock’n’Roll’. Breathless, compelling, outstanding.

And then it was over. No milking the crowd for more, no false encores. Just walking off stage after the final number in true punk fashion and abandoning their instruments to a feedback wall of sound.

While providing support tonight, the ‪Michael Monroe‬ Band are very much a headlining act that few bands would choose to, or could, follow. It is not surprising that they have just been confirmed as a headliner at the Hard Rock Hell (HRH) Festival in the UK next November. With a new album on the way next year, here’s hoping for a UK headlining tour to follow.

Watch out for the Rockfiend Publications Scotland interview with ‪Michael Monroe‬’s guitarist/writer ‪Steve Conte‬ coming soon.

GMcA


GLENN HUGHES PERFORMS CLASSIC DEEP PURPLE

“LIVE”

O2 Academy

Glasgow

12 October 2018

Gig Review by Graeme McAlister

Photos by MB Photos Scotland

Glenn Hughes needs no introduction as a vocalist, bass player or rock legend. But I really didn’t know what to expect when asked to review this gig, as I am quite wary of classic artists, however respected, revisiting their decades-old back catalogues in case it ends in disappointment; singers, in particular, can be cruelly exposed by decreasing vocal ranges and all too often things are better left in the past. But, tonight in Glasgow, in the case of Glenn Hughes, I found an artist very much on form, and going for and hitting high notes that few of his or any generation would dare.

Warming the crowd up was English blues rock guitarist, Laurence Jones and his band. Displaying an impressive technical ability, and benefitting from a great guitar sound, Laurence squeezed every ounce of emotion out of his Telecaster as the gradually swelling crowd warmed to a mix of original material and particularly covers of “All Along The Watchtower” and “Fortunate Son”. But they were really only here to see one act.

In deciding to embark on this tour, Glenn Hughes and his band sought not to replicate the studio sound of classic Deep Purple, but instead to recapture the live experience in which much of this material took on a life of it’s own. To do this he put together a band who he thought would be capable of this task and of supporting him on vocals and bass - Danish guitarist Soren Anderson (of Scandinavian rock band the Electric Guitars, Mike Tramp and Marco Mendoza), fellow Dane Jesper Bo Hansen on keyboards and Fernando Escobedo on drums.

Over the course of an 1hr and 50 minutes Glenn Hughes and his band delivered an 11 song set. Set opener ‘Stormbringer’ rapidly dispelled any doubts that Glenn could still sing and then some, and was followed by ‘Might Just Take Your Life’ and “Sail Away”. But, for me, it was on “Gettin’ Tighter” that the band really hit their groove – probably one of the highlights of the gig. “You Keep on Moving” was then followed by “You Fool No One” wrapped around a strong version of “High Ball Shooter”, interspersed with keyboard, guitar and drum solos.

Fans of classic rock are divided over who they believed to be the best vocalist in Deep Purple; after all, few bands can boast of having featured Ian Gillan, David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes all within their ranks. And even fewer bands can boast of a stronger run of four classic rock songs than set closers “Mistreated’ and “Smoke on the Water”, followed by deserved encores of “Burn” and “Highway Star”. Without antagonising Purple purists, what is beyond doubt is that, on the basis of tonight’s performance, Glenn Hughes is still more than capable of taking on and delivering classics from different eras of the band in addition to demonstrating the more soulful side to his voice, as when seguing from “Smoke on the Water” into Ray Charles’ “Georgia on My Mind”.

While the evening was about celebrating the classic music of Deep Purple live, it was disappointing that Soren Anderson, a great guitarist in his own right, was not given more space to do his own thing and that the guitar was not further up the mix.

As might be expected, the audience was largely of an age to have followed and listened to Deep Purple in their prime, to have seen it, bought the t-shirt and not to be easily impressed … and this Glasgow audience was impressed.

For those who have missed seeing him on the current tour, Glenn Hughes returns to the UK to perform a second leg of Classic Deep Purple “Live” from 14-24 May 2019.

GMcA


GLENN HUGHES

 PERFORMS CLASSIC DEEP PURPLE

“LIVE”

O2 Academy

Glasgow

12 October 2018

Gig Review by Graeme McAlister

Photos by MB Photos Scotland

Glenn Hughes needs no introduction as a vocalist, bass player or rock legend. But I really didn’t know what to expect when asked to review this gig, as I am quite wary of classic artists, however respected, revisiting their decades-old back catalogues in case it ends in disappointment; singers, in particular, can be cruelly exposed by decreasing vocal ranges and all too often things are better left in the past. But, tonight in Glasgow, in the case of Glenn Hughes, I found an artist very much on form, and going for and hitting high notes that few of his or any generation would dare.

Warming the crowd up was English blues rock guitarist, Laurence Jones and his band. Displaying an impressive technical ability, and benefitting from a great guitar sound, Laurence squeezed every ounce of emotion out of his Telecaster as the gradually swelling crowd warmed to a mix of original material and particularly covers of “All Along The Watchtower” and “Fortunate Son”. But they were really only here to see one act.

In deciding to embark on this tour, Glenn Hughes and his band sought not to replicate the studio sound of classic Deep Purple, but instead to recapture the live experience in which much of this material took on a life of it’s own. To do this he put together a band who he thought would be capable of this task and of supporting him on vocals and bass - Danish guitarist Soren Anderson (of Scandinavian rock band the Electric Guitars, Mike Tramp and Marco Mendoza), fellow Dane Jesper Bo Hansen on keyboards and Fernando Escobedo on drums.

Over the course of an 1hr and 50 minutes Glenn Hughes and his band delivered an 11 song set. Set opener ‘Stormbringer’ rapidly dispelled any doubts that Glenn could still sing and then some, and was followed by ‘Might Just Take Your Life’ and “Sail Away”. But, for me, it was on “Gettin’ Tighter” that the band really hit their groove – probably one of the highlights of the gig. “You Keep on Moving” was then followed by “You Fool No One” wrapped around a strong version of “High Ball Shooter”, interspersed with keyboard, guitar and drum solos.

Fans of classic rock are divided over who they believed to be the best vocalist in Deep Purple; after all, few bands can boast of having featured Ian Gillan, David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes all within their ranks. And even fewer bands can boast of a stronger run of four classic rock songs than set closers “Mistreated’ and “Smoke on the Water”, followed by deserved encores of “Burn” and “Highway Star”. Without antagonising Purple purists, what is beyond doubt is that, on the basis of tonight’s performance, Glenn Hughes is still more than capable of taking on and delivering classics from different eras of the band in addition to demonstrating the more soulful side to his voice, as when seguing from “Smoke on the Water” into Ray Charles’ “Georgia on My Mind”.

While the evening was about celebrating the classic music of Deep Purple live, it was disappointing that Soren Anderson, a great guitarist in his own right, was not given more space to do his own thing and that the guitar was not further up the mix.

As might be expected, the audience was largely of an age to have followed and listened to Deep Purple in their prime, to have seen it, bought the t-shirt and not to be easily impressed … and this Glasgow audience was impressed.

For those who have missed seeing him on the current tour, Glenn Hughes returns to the UK to perform a second leg of Classic Deep Purple “Live” from 14-24 May 2019.

GMcA


HRH C.R.O.W.S

Sheffield

02 Academy

8th-9th September 2018

Review by Simon Furness

Here we are at the first HRH C.R.O.W.S festival, after the brand have pretty much covered every other genre in the rock universe it is now the turn of all bands with a southern rock/country flavour to share the two stages in Sheffield, it has to be said it’s an impressive collection of bands, talk about great value for money.

Looking at the festival circuit with several events this year ultimately not making it with cancelled gigs and disappointed punters hats have to come off to HRH for championing this and all the other festivals they put on each year.

After the necessity to eat before gigging I missed the first few bands but made it in to see a little of The Fargo Railroad Company, it seemed quite a low key entrance as they went about their business serving up plenty of their own brand of southern rock with plenty of charm to get by.

A quick march upstairs and I find myself with hardly room to stand in the second venue, clearly this crowd know something until now I wasn’t aware of.

The Outlaw Orchestra all the way from the deep south of the UK! Little did I know they would be one of my finds of the weekend.

The band describe their sound as Darkgrass, a real mix of Cajun/Country/Rock and Dixie with guitar and drums complementing double bass and banjo.

This primitive but utterly addictive form of music strikes the right chord with the appreciative crowd, hotter than hell itself in the room and each song received with much hooting and hollering.

Talking to the band later we find that they’ve been asked back to play the big room next year, no shocks there and totally deserved...check them out.

Buffalo Summer draw a large crowd downstairs, an energetic performance is what they get and enthusiastically received, a well paced set of harder but more commercial set of Americana is what they get.

Federal Charm hail from Manchester, I saw them a number of years ago and they impressed me then, here we are down the road and although there’s a change in personnel which sees Tom Guyer handling vocal duties and Josh Zahler on drums the band have lost none of their appeal, the set they played featured much of their long awaited “Passengers” album due only a few days later, no surprises then that the material went down very well with the crowd.

‘Swing Sinner’, ‘Choke’ and ‘Halo’ to name but a few that hit the spot, the band managing to sound modern even though the music is steeped in tradition.

Paul Bowe effortlessly plays around every song contributing his own fine musicality to the tracks on guitar, it’s a joy to watch and no doubt word will spread far and wide about this band.

In contrast Jo Harman and her band sound laid back, it’s a professionally executed set full of atmosphere with a band to complement Jo’s fabulous voice.

It’s a little bluesy, soulful and at times rocking and I see no one complaining as we approach our finale for day one.

Anyone familiar with Dan Baird and Homemade Sin will know of Dan’s fight with health over the last year, I hear people in the crowd talking and asking the question as to whether he will be up to it and find myself smiling at the inevitable answer to that particular question.

Bearing in mind this is a festival and there are strict curfews in place the band are afforded and hour and a half to stake their claim as headliners.

The band hit the stage with nothing to prove but they do anyway and time fly’s by.

‘Shake It Till Its Sore’, ‘6 Years Gone’ and ‘I Love You Period’ all below the tempo drops for ‘Crooked Smile’ but just for a short time as Warner and Sean solo frantically over it, a joy to watch.

‘Little Darlin’ and ‘Mon Cheri’ pick the set back up again before Satellite classic ‘Keep Your Hands to Yourself’ has the whole place grooving.

There’s an undeniable swagger to the band who are clearly enjoying the ability to stretch out and use all of this stage but at the same time they are so together each sharing a glance every now and again to keep things in order, Mauro the incredible beat keeper and Dan the consummate frontman.

Wrapping the whole gig up with a frantic version of ‘Railroad Steel’ the whole band getting turns individually to dazzle a full house, dazzle they did and it’s a more than worthy finale to the set and day one.

Job done gentlemen, be seeing you again soon no doubt.

Day 2

The list of bands looking a lot less familiar to me but I’m intrigued and turn up early to cram as much in as possible.

With people pouring into the venue Stonewire, well two of them kick off Sunday with an acoustic set with Sky taking the opportunity to sing us a few songs from next year’s new album as well as a few favourites.

I hear enough to keep me glued to the barrier and 20 minutes fly by whilst enjoying the stripped back set and chance to hear Sky’s rich vocal, they appeared to have their own fanbase in the room too, so this added to the atmosphere, great job.

Next up we had Elles Bailey with her guitarist.

There’s so much quality in this young lady’s voice and you would struggle not to like her to be honest, mixing soulful vocal with blues and country, influences coming from all over the place. I wish I’d managed to catch the electric set later in the day but clashes were inevitable so for now a shortened set was all I got to witness, the duet she sang with Zack Logan was stunning and will remain with me for a long time.

Zack was up next for an acoustic set and although this was his first trip to blighty he seemed right at home in this busy room playing more traditional country, the tempo not dropping as he elected to play more upbeat numbers in his set, one to watch out for and a lovely guy if you ever get the chance for a chat.

Nobody told Gorilla Riot they weren’t headlining this festival, they exploded onto the main stage and even from my viewpoint at the back of the room they projected way beyond the front few rows, the band certainly have a bright future and go down very well, an energetic rocking set.

Thirteen Stars are no strangers to the HRH circuit, they played to a packed second stage and the sound is perfect for this band who are so tight as they reel out a familiar set backed with plenty of tongue in cheek humour from front man Hoss Thompson.

Surely more success will follow this band from Cumbria, they have so much talent they deserve it. Hope they managed to find their missing gear!

Jared James Nichols and his band absolutely smashed it on the main stage, one part Leslie West and one part Ted Nugent the frontman covered every inch of the stage playing much of his “Black Magic” album, I thoroughly enjoyed the set which even included a superb version of Mountain’s ‘Mississippi Queen’.

This young man is a massive talent so look out for him, also his bass player Gregg has to be the grinning champion of the weekend, talk about happy to be here!

I hear people exclaiming that Broken Witt Rebels aren’t rock! I wonder if they thought the same after the hour long set which saw this young band perfectly execute their own brand of rock, a mix of many ingredients a found them hypnotic and looking around me I wasn’t in a minority.

Roll on the new album recently recorded in the states.

So now were left with one more band, The Devon Allman Project finish us off with some beautifully executed southern rock, faithful to both Devon Allman and Duane Betts parents from The Allman Brothers the set featured few songs obviously due to their length but how brilliant it was, musicianship second to none with tone to die for which had guitar players drooling right across the front row.

It was great to hear such classics as ‘Blue Sky’, ‘Dreams’ and ‘In Memory of Elizabeth Reed’ with our own naked ears and already I’m forgetting I have a late-night journey home after this set. Midnight Rider closes out what has been a memorable two days in Yorkshire, it keeps me smiling for a good couple of hours as I feel privileged to have witnessed what I just have.

Many thanks to the team from HRH for putting on such a great celebration of music, I’m already looking forward to next year, dates in the diary guys!

SF


Ryan Hamilton & The Harlequin Ghosts

Voodoo Rooms

Edinburgh

11th October 2018

Gig Review by

Graeme McAlister

If you haven’t heard of Ryan Hamilton yet, I predict that is about to change. And if you are wondering what he and his band sound like – imagine if Tom Petty and Ginger Wildheart had met and spent a weekend holed up in a room together competing to come up with the most outrageous melodies and hooks … it might just have sounded like this. Or, to put it another way, ridiculously infectious tunes - once heard, never forgotten.

The last few years have been busy for Ryan since his first album, ‘Hell of a Day’, was released in 2015. A rockier power pop sound followed with another album and a digital EP collection of fan club songs both recorded with his band, The Traitors, and independently funded and promoted. If that wasn’t enough, he also somehow managed to fit in a Pledge collaboration with Tony Wright of Terrorvision.

Despite being based in Texas, and his bandmates in the UK, he has toured extensively around the UK, including supporting Ginger Wildheart and then earlier this year supported by The Main Grains (another band to watch). Their hard work and touring has paid off and things have started to happen for the band. They’ve signed to Little Steven’s Wicked Cool label in the States, they’ve been getting a lot of airplay on Kerrang radio and evolved into Ryan Hamilton & The Harlequin Ghosts. Knowing that this may be their last headlining tour here for some time while they focus on widening their audience beyond the UK, I approached tonight’s gig (in what has to be one of the most ornate music venues I’ve attended) with some anticipation.

So, how was the gig? Well, rather than wasting time, building up and keeping you in suspense, let’s just jump straight to the conclusion – FAN-BLOODY-TASTIC (polite version to avoid getting blocked). Yes, as a reviewer, there is a need to be objective, but, as a passionate fan of music, this was a great gig by anyone’s standards.

Playing a 15 song set, the band took the crowd on a journey of soaring melodies and crashing guitars, with a word perfect crowd acting as backing singers – not just the choruses, it has to be said, but, in most cases, the full songs. The set included no fewer than 6 songs from ‘Hell of a Day’ (‘Be Kind, Rewind’, ‘4 Letter Verb’, ‘Records and Needles’, ‘Medicine’, ‘Karaoke with No Crowd’ and ‘Freak Flag’) and 5 songs off of 2017’s ‘Devil’s in the Detail’ (‘Smarter’ - with it’s addictive chorus “I’m still not clean, and I’m not sober. I’m just a little bit smarter and a whole lot older” -, ‘We Never Should Have Moved to L.A.’, ‘Heavy Heart’, ‘The Gulf of Mexico’ and ‘Strength in Numbers’). Not to mention new single ‘Bottoms Up’ and the B side - a cover of Paula Abdul’s ‘Straight Up’ (it shouldn’t work, but, don’t ask me why, it does). Although ending the set on a high, the absence of an encore did leave the crowd wanting more.

In Ryan Hamilton the band have what has to be one of most likeable and charismatic frontmen on the live circuit at this time, using the crowd as a willing therapist and whose rapport with the audience helped overcome repeated tuning problems with his guitar, not assisted by a very small stage. And as for The Harlequin Ghosts - a group of sharp-dressed musicians who look and sound as if they have been playing together for years; Dave Winkler (as good a lead guitarist as I have seen for sometime), Rob Lane on bass, Carol Hodge on keyboards and backing vocals, and Mickey Richards on drums (and cymbals solo - almost).

If you’re reading this and thinking “sh*t, I’d love to have seen them”, don’t despair. Their tour continues until 19 October. Then they will be going back out on the road supporting The Alarm on a seven date UK tour of larger venues in late November and early December providing the perfect excuse for an early Christmas night out. Go on, buy a ticket, treat yourself and give yourself a present. You deserve it.

And while tonight was undoubtedly the night of Ryan Hamilton and the Harlequin Ghosts, much respect is due for touring with a support band of the calibre of Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers. Hailing from Arizona, with a genre-defying sound sure to warm the heart of anyone who savours rock-orientated, good-time, and possibly alternative, guitar-based music (and unknown to me before tonight) they are a band who I am looking forward to becoming much more familiar with.

GMcA


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Halestorm

02 Academy

Bristol

29th September 2018

Gig Review by Ryan Dainty

The Halestorm show was clearly a sell-out, the ubiquitous queue never seemingly ending snaking well past the entrance in both directions meant that viewing space for this show was going to be at a premium in a venue that is not very forgiving for good viewing vantage points.

Despite that everyone managed to cram themselves in up the stairs flanking the main floor area which suggested there was going to be very little room to manoeuvre a steady pint up or down for the entire night. After levering myself into a suitable space I prepared for the night ahead.

Rews were the first on hailing from London and Belfast and turned in a set somewhat reminiscent of a female Royal Blood, well, being a two-piece outfit there is always going to be the obvious comparisons. As like most bands do their sound came across far heavier than that on their studio release ‘Pyro’ which given their stage mates for tonight’s show is a positive as it gave the crowd a decent warm up to proceedings. They seemed comfortable and competent and after producing a relatively short but high energy drum bashing, guitar fuelled set Shauna Tohill and Collette Williams seemingly picked up a few new fans along the way. The highlights for me were ‘Shake Shake’ and ‘Can you feel it’ both songs transposed from their original recordings to the live show well.

The circus was only just about to begin of course, with lead in music that could have you thinking you were in the big top as the crowd anticipated the arrival of Avatar.

The ringmaster Johannes Eckerström hits the stage regaled in full make up and they immediately push on with ‘Hail the Apocalypse’ their musical stylings very much avante garde melodic death metal and certainly not in the same vein or genre as Rews before them. From the start it is clear that they have a hardcore following down the front and some with full make up and Avatar etched into the side of their heads. They did not over saturate the performance with tracks off their new album ‘Avatar Country’ not least due to the fact that every track has the word ‘king’ in the title! In truth, the music is not without melody in some parts but it may not be to everyone’s tastes. Johannes played very much to the crowd with lots of referencing to Bristol we love you and Bristol your great etc and the whole set went down well if not passing in a blur for some. They rounded off their set with ‘Smells like a Freakshow’ and that was the overall divine pleasure in the proceedings, a freakshow for some but indeed a visual and audible delight for the paying masses.

Then onto the band that everyone turned up to witness, Halestorm with Lzzy Hale rocking the look of Joan Jett dressed in a short skirt, crop top, leather jacket and boots which the most devout wearer of heels would have issues even standing up in. The other notable outfit was perhaps an odd choice by her brother on drums Arejay sporting a short sleeved pink jacket, pink shorts and pink tie combo with shades, at this point reminiscent of someone from an 80’s teen flick, however this guy can twirl and flick drumsticks around like no other it seems. They kick off with ‘Vicious’ which stirs up the crowd and gets everyone moving about and then onto ‘Mz Hyde’ and this is a band clearly polished in their playing and performance if not a little static on stage at times, that does not deter the crowd however. Lzzy’s voice has appeared to get even more raspier over the years, certainly since the last time I caught them live and she interacts with the crowd whilst almost screaming the introductions as ‘I Am The Fire’ which goes down a storm and virtually has the whole crowd singing along. They of course play more tracks from their album which goes down well but what really incites the fever in the 02 is the back catalogue, ‘Love Bites(So Do I)’ just hits the right spot with its pace and intensity and crunching guitars before unleashing ‘Amen’ which gets the requisite Amens coming back from the crowd with ‘Skulls’ from the new release sandwiched in-between.

They take things down a few notches as Lzzy addresses the crowd imparting some stories of being on the road and she and Joe Hottinger then get down to the balladic tune ‘The Silence’ an intimate moment between them and the fans which is lapped up. ‘Vicious’ the title track from the album gets the rocking back on track before ‘Freak Like Me’ whips the crowd into a frenzy. ‘It’s Not You’, ‘Killing Ourselves to Live’ and ‘Black Vultures’ follow before heading off and into the realms of encore time. ‘I Miss The Misery’ clearly the obvious choice for this part of the show and the singing along does not end as the bustling throng join in full voice to this anthemic track. They close their last date in the UK this time around with the powerful ballad ‘Here’s to Us’ where they pull on stage Rews and Avatar with Lzzy milking the crowd with all the thanks being dished out, asking the crowd to make some noise for anything and everything, something they were happy to do.

This sees Lzzy looking her most mobile on stage having got rid of the shackles of her guitar and really unleashing her vocal range. All in all, Halestorm played a tight, well-rehearsed set which should probably be expected as this was their final show of the UK leg of the tour, in the end all in attendance witnessed a mixed show of differing genres but that’s what keeps rock and metal interesting and this more than satisfied the paying punters.

RD